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Snapshots of Dementia: Sometimes, We Cry

Posted by on December 3, 2020 in Dementia | 6 comments

Snapshots of Dementia: Sometimes, We Cry

Unsplash/K. Mitch Hodge I heard Tom before I saw him. As he came through the front door, he sobbed. Working to sort, discard and pack our belongings in advance of putting our Florida home on the market, I’d had a few moments to myself while Tom went with one of our daughters to the county dump. He had driven one car and she, another. (Only a few weeks later, we had to take away his keys.) “Baby! What’s the matter?” I called out as I hurried to meet him. His shoulder shook and the tears poured down his face. “I just hate it when I get things mixed up,” he said. “I bet [our daughter] is so mad at me.” He’d forgotten where the dump was, a lapse that cost them extra time. And no, our daughter wasn’t upset, but it took him several moments to calm down. If you asked Tom about his illness today, he would say he has early-onset dementia, although he might not be able to tell you its name. But back then, we still had no diagnosis, and most of the time, he exhibited the typical FTD anosognosia or lack of awareness of his cognitive lapses and their effects. As our life continued to spiral in scary directions, this proved at best frustrating and at worst maddening. That day, I realized something: I prefer it when he remains unaware. If he doesn’t know he’s forgotten, doesn’t realize he’s caused some sort of problem, doesn’t understand it’s not the website’s fault or the phone’s fault or the television’s fault but his own, he doesn’t understand his decline. And he doesn’t cry. That wasn’t the first day Tom cried, but it was the last for a while. He didn’t cry when, that same week, he made an inappropriate (not sexual) comment to a female friend. He didn’t cry when I put the house on the market. He didn’t cry when, night after night, I would come home from a long day at work, cook dinner, pack or do freelance work while he played on his phone, watched television or slept. He didn’t cry when our children traveled hundreds, even thousands of miles to help us move—or when they left (two for what we thought at the time would be years overseas). The disease has affected the part of his brain that controls emotional reactions, and the damage is uneven. Sometimes his responses are exaggerated, and at other times, blunted. With his and other dementias, what you see happening is not always what you get by way of response. Sometimes, he still cries. We have recently begun attending in-person worship despite his vulnerability to COVID-19 because our church opened up a masks-required section. But every week, he’s cried on the way to church and through part of the service. Although he can’t often articulate his thoughts, I believe he grieves what should still be and, because of his dementia, is not.  A job as a pastor. A leadership role. The opportunity to make a real difference in others’ lives. The moments of clarity are often the moments that bring tears. One evening this summer, he seemed especially aware, and I tried to ask how he was feeling about all the changes in our lives. Most of his...

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Snapshots of Dementia: More Puzzle Pieces

Posted by on November 13, 2020 in Dementia | 6 comments

Snapshots of Dementia: More Puzzle Pieces

Photo by Fabiran Kühne on Unsplash Clearly life has gotten in the way of blog posts, and that will happen sometimes. But as I return to the blog, I want to dive back into our journey toward diagnosis (I’m really not trying to make it take as long as the actual journey!).  You can find the most recent segment related to diagnosis at this link. In that previous post, I discussed a visit with the third neurologist we saw in our effort to discover what was going on with Tom’s health/memory/behavior and other problems. By this time, I had made some big decisions, most especially the ones that involved selling our home and moving to be closer to family in the upstate of South Carolina (here, we’re closer to our two oldest daughters, one a few minutes away from us and one in Atlanta, only two hours away). I knew that no matter what the doctors said, something was definitely wrong with Tom. I knew he had lost three jobs in quick succession and that we could no longer allow him to drive. And I knew I couldn’t count on him to lead and provide for our family in the way he had for so long. But I still needed help to get a diagnosis. I hoped it would be a path toward disability benefits if, as we thought, he could no longer hold down a job. And I especially needed a diagnosis because I hoped doctors could stop or slow down the disease. This third neurologist was the first one to mention FTD, or frontotemporal degeneration. I’m a writer and editor by profession and also by identity. That means I’m the type of person who will research and read everything I can on any given topic. I’ve already told you more in these posts about FTD than I knew at that point, now about a year and a half ago. But here are some of the key characteristics that stood out to me in my very early research on the topic: —FTD typically strikes younger people (the age range for onset is 21-80, but the majority of cases occur between 45 and 64.) Tom had just turned 63, and I’d suspected problems since well before he turned 60. —FTD is frequently misdiagnosed. Enough said. —FTD is less common and less known than Alzheimer’s. —FTD has no known treatment or cure. This site says, “no current treatments stop or slow the progression of the disease.” And that’s one of the reasons I want to keep writing. As we raise awareness, we can also advocate for research (it’s happening, but slowly) and work toward a brighter future for others faced with this deadly diagnosis. I also learned that FTD has some subtypes including corticobasal syndrome, which affects movement; primary progressive aphasia (PPA), which results in the gradual loss of the ability to speak, read, write and understand speech; and the behavioral variant, which is the type we believe Tom has. There can also be a genetic connection between FTD and amyotrophic lateral sclerois (ALS). Each type is distinct, but as the disease progresses, the symptoms tend to merge. And yes, I do see this merging happening with Tom. Reading about the behavioral variant type was shocking and, in a strange...

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Snapshots of Dementia: 7 Facts I Wish I’d Known (Before I Learned by Living)

Posted by on October 14, 2020 in Dementia | 6 comments

Snapshots of Dementia: 7 Facts I Wish I’d Known (Before I Learned by Living)

Pixabay/Gordon Johnson Much of what I’ve shared in these snapshots of dementia so far has a connection to my own ignorance. Of course, you don’t know what you don’t know. So while I don’t blame myself for what I didn’t understand, I sometimes wish I could have a do-over—for Tom’s sake and for my own as well as our family and friends. If a do-over were somehow possible, here are a few of the things I wish I’d known earlier on. 1. Dementia is not a natural consequence of aging. Because one of my grandfathers showed signs of dementia in his 80s and people said, “That’s what happens when you get old,” I honestly thought his age was the primary factor (even though nothing like this happened to my other grandparents, who all lived into their 80s or 90s). I wish  I had known more about Grandpa’s problem and even tried to help him more. I think what I saw in him contributed to my misperception (which, I have learned, is common). 2. Dementia is not one but many diseases. Like most people, I’d heard of Alzheimer’s. I knew a little about Parkinson’s Disease, which has related dementia. But I certainly didn’t know about the wide range of dementia disorders, symptoms and problems that exist. Some of the most common in addition to Alzheimer’s include Lewy Body Dementia, vascular dementia and the type my husband has: frontotemporal degeneration or FTD. 3. All dementias are not created equal. This is a corollary to No. 2, because each disease has its own characteristics and qualities. Because Tom’s dementia is still classified as rare (rare enough that many neurologists and other medical professionals seem to have little knowledge of it), I write partly to inform others. I had no idea, for example, that dementia could cause drastic shifts in behavior, personality and ability even at a fairly young age (many FTD patients are much younger than Tom, who, I now believe has shown symptoms for some time). I didn’t know, and as you may have read in the blog, neither did most of our doctors, apparently. 4. Dementia involves more than just memory loss. As explained above, dementias vary from type to type. They can also vary significantly from person to person. Pre-diagnosis, my main perception of dementia was that people who had it grew older, forgot things and became confused. I did not, however, realize that dementia symptoms could include things like loss of the sense of smell (no, this is not the COVID-19 temporary loss); a slowing down in overall thinking; obsessive-compulsive behavior; swallowing issues; apathy and withdrawal from social relationships; language loss and so much more (these are all symptoms Tom has, but they are not the only or even his only symptoms). Some patients don’t show memory loss until they are quite far along into their disease. So why is that the major symptom we associate with dementia? 5. Dementia is a terminal disease. I remember how shocked I was the day I read that FTD will one day kill my husband. Of course, like anyone else, he could die from a number of other causes. But I never understood that the normal course of dementia means that the brain will continue to lose function, which will result...

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Snapshots of Dementia: A Merry Heart

Posted by on September 24, 2020 in Dementia | 4 comments

Forgetful Jones (Facebook/Sesame Street) “A merry heart does good, like medicine, But a broken spirit dries up the bones” (Prov. 17:22, NKJV). We all have different ideas about dementia; I know I did before we began this journey. And truly, even as transparent as I try to be on my blog, I haven’t yet caught up to present-day except for some occasional glimpses. So this is that! Anyone who knows Tom, in past or present, knows about his trademark sense of humor. Although he has the typical anosognosia (“without knowledge of disease”) of many people with dementia and doesn’t realize the extent of his deficits, he does now know he has frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), and he does know his thinking has changed. He still jokes, although he’s often using lines he’s said for many years. But sometimes his comebacks surprise me, especially since his thinking seems to have slowed down a great deal in the past few months. Last spring, while we still lived in Florida, I made a casual joke about something he would “probably forget.” He looked at me very seriously and said, “I think this is something that is OK for me to joke about, but not OK for you.” Though this may seem like a double standard, I understand exactly what he meant. Many of us women are sensitive about our weight. It might be fine for us to joke about our own chubby tummy or thigh rolls, but we don’t prefer that anyone else do so. And it’s the same with dementia. I’ve been careful ever since to make sure Tom initiates the jokes and/or I only repeat things we’ve said multiple times. As a person created in the image of God, he is and will always be worthy of both respect and love. That being said, Tom has retained his sense of humor. I think I mentioned our joke about his “good ideas” once before. Somehow it has stayed with him that his ideas aren’t the best (to read more about this, see this post.) And so occasionally he will say to me, “I have a great idea!” knowing it may not be, or describe something silly that happens (like this week, when he failed to put the carafe under the coffeemaker and sent coffee all over the counter, then put the top back on incorrectly so that even more coffee spilled) as a “great idea.” I am thankful that having the privilege to work from home has prevented most of the other sorts of “great ideas” from happening. Something else he jokes about is taking his medicine. His short-term memory has become so very short that almost every day, I remind him multiple times to take his medicine (vitamins as well as prescriptions) both morning and evening. He may respond that yes, he will take it, but that doesn’t necessarily mean he will without more reminders. And he may say yes, he has taken it, but that doesn’t necessarily mean he has. So on the days he occasionally misses or doesn’t take his morning dose till late morning, he tells me, “See how much money I’m saving us?” On this, he’s only half-kidding. Always careful with money (except when he was giving it away to online scammers), he is somewhat obsessed with...

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Snapshots of Dementia: Driven to Distraction, Part 1

Posted by on August 26, 2020 in Dementia | 4 comments

Snapshots of Dementia: Driven to Distraction, Part 1

Photo by Marc-Olivier Jodoin on Unsplash Before we could return to neurologist No. 3 for the second time, a crisis occurred that forced our family into a huge decision. At this point, Tom was still driving. In fact, he was driving for a ride-share company. Sounds crazy for someone who might have dementia, right? Well, yes. And no. Think about it. He had lost three jobs in quick succession. Where could he find work? He loved to drive. And although he struggled with directions now, God and GPS cover a multitude of sins. Add that to the fact that no doctor had diagnosed any specific problem beyond depression, and you’ll see why (although I did have concerns) Tom remained on the road. I discussed Tom’s driving with my adult children (for a while, I had noticed him following more closely than he should) and they agreed that removing driving privileges would be difficult. When necessary, maybe a doctor could make that decision, but not right now. That was our plan. So yes, I’ll go ahead and say it: We were wrong. And I apologize to anyone I may have unknowingly scared or hurt because we were not more proactive. And I pray—and fear—for all of those who may be endangered by those still in the diagnosis or pre-diagnosis process with a disease like Tom’s. I’m convinced; there are many still on the road who should not be. Here’s what happened. Tom was driving for the rideshare company and quite happy to do so. I wasn’t as happy, because he was staying out for longer and longer periods of time. He had a certain daily financial goal, and he would stay out until he reached it. No. Matter. What. Of course, I didn’t know then about the obsessions his type of dementia (frontotemporal degeneration, or FTD) causes (read more about that in this post.) His desire to work and the low pay rate played right into this. The more he drove, the more he wanted to drive. And although I didn’t realize it at the time, I now know he didn’t have the logic or understanding to think, I’m tired. I should stop driving. I need to go home. For him, it truly was all about the money. He was so happy to contribute to our family finances again that he would drive. And drive. And sleep at the side of the road. And drive. As days and weeks passed, I became more and more concerned about his hours. I had more than one serious talk with him where he would promise to “only” work eight hours. Of course, he never kept those promises. At the time, I thought he didn’t want to keep them. Here’s what I didn’t understand: He couldn’t. Within a very short period of time, 10 days or so, several things happened that spurred us to action. The first: Tom got a ticket, not for speeding, but for turning left on red. With a passenger in his car. And with a policeman right behind him. Then and now, I looked on this as providential. The policeman gave him quite the lecture. Maybe it even stuck for a few hours or days.  But at least he didn’t cause an accident. I thought the rideshare company might flag...

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Snapshots of Dementia: The Great Depression (or not)

Posted by on August 4, 2020 in Dementia | 6 comments

Snapshots of Dementia: The Great Depression (or not)

Photo by Stefano Pollio on Unsplash If your snapshots are anything like mine, they fill a shoebox (OK, mine fill an entire trunk) and most are in random order. I have long-ago dreams of putting them in beautiful, chronological albums (I’m sure God has a special place in heaven for those who have achieved this wondrous feat), but so far, it hasn’t happened. I don’t think it will happen with these snapshots either. So, although I’ve written somewhat chronologically, you may have noticed I’ve also skipped back, forth and around as I’ve focused my lens on different parts of our journey and of Tom’s disease. And I imagine that, even if you’ve never been exposed to dementia before, you’ve seen that this disease is exactly like that. Messy. Disorganized. Uncomfortable. I’ll move us forward a bit on our timeline to our visits with a second neurologist. We’re all the way up to early 2019 now, and many things have changed for Tom. Just the year before, his first neurologist told us (for the second time) that things were basically fine, that he just had some short-term memory loss and (for the first and only time) that he was “better than the 80-year-old Alzheimer’s patients I see.” A neuropsychologist had also done extensive testing (which I eventually found out our insurance did not cover, although no one told me that at the time; I mention this so anyone reading will check first and not have to shell out the nearly $1800 I did almost a year later). This doctor concluded that Tom was very intelligent, probably had adult ADHD (a diagnosis he had already received) and was dealing with shame as the result of some of his extremely poor and uncharacteristic behavioral choices over the past few years. No one told us about frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), behavioral type. No one mentioned that dementia could not only cause memory loss and confused thinking but that it could also cause personality changes of the extreme type we saw in Tom. No one mentioned that perhaps he didn’t have a moral problem but a mental one. That’s why I have such a deep commitment to tell our story. I did suspect a problem; I just didn’t realize so much of what I was seeing in my husband was tied to what we now know to be FTD. But I digress. Finally, we visited a second neurologist. This one came recommended from more than one friend. I was confident that this time, we would get some answers. So much had changed in Tom’s life that I felt sure the doctor would see the problems right away. We had (well, I had, because Tom could no longer fill out anything so complicated) lots of paperwork to fill out before this visit, but I didn’t mind. I wanted the doctor to have information. I even added a copy of a letter from our former pastor about the changes he had seen in Tom’s work ability, moving from “highly competent” to much less than that over the more than five-year period Tom had served under him. At this  visit, the neurologist and her staff asked lots of questions. In fact, we spoke more with the staff than we did with the doctor. She examined Tom briefly and...

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Snapshots of Dementia: 3 Lessons From Lincoln for Grandma (and any Caregiver)

Posted by on September 11, 2020 in Dementia | 6 comments

Snapshots of Dementia: 3 Lessons From Lincoln for Grandma (and any Caregiver)

Tom meets his grandson, 1 month old. Dear Lincoln, You’re too young to read this although I’m sure, as advanced as you already are, it won’t be long before you are reading not only letters but entire books. First of all, I want to wish you a great  big HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Grandpa and Grandma love you very much and can’t believe you’re already 3 years old. As soon as you’re old enough (and hopefully no sooner), someone will tell you about the sad things that happened many years ago on this day. I want you to know that your birthday has given 9/11 new meaning for our family. We do remember the sad things, of course, but we also celebrate the wonderful ones—like you. And do you know what? That’s just who you are in our lives. Your joy in the world God has given us has helped change what might otherwise be a sad time into one of wonder and delight. Watching you play and laugh with Grandpa blesses me more than you can possibly know. You love him in a pure and powerful way that amazes, inspires and challenges me every time. He even told me once that he doesn’t have to worry about what he might say or do around you because he knows you love him no matter what. That is a huge gift to us both. I want to share with you three things I have learned from you, Lincoln. And all three of them help me do a better job taking care of Grandpa. 1. COMPASSION: Grandpa coughs a lot, and sometimes he stumbles. And almost every time you’re around when he does one of these things, I hear you say, “You OK, Gwampa?” Your heart of concern helps me not taking even the smallest or most-repeated issues for granted. Lincoln, Grandpa is always more OK whenever he is with you. 2. PRESENCE: You love nothing more than having Grandpa and Grandma come up to your room and play, or sit beside you on the couch or even travel with you on the iPad as you videochat with us. We love the pictures you color, the cards you “sign” and the crafts you make. But even at only three years old, you’ve already taught me: Presence is the very best present of all. 3. CELEBRATION: Grandpa and I still laugh about the day you told us, “I’m so amazing!” I’m glad you have so much wisdom at such a young age. You are amazing, Lincoln, because of an amazing God who loves you even more than we do and made you “in an amazing and wonderful way” (Ps. 139:14a, NCV). We need to celebrate this on your birthday—and every other day as well. I know you are starting to learn about Jesus. A long time ago, some of Jesus’ followers asked Him who was the greatest. (Even way back then, people worried about silly things like that.) Instead of pointing out the strongest or the biggest or the smartest one, Jesus called over a little child and had everyone look. He told His followers, “I tell you the truth, you must change and become like little children. Otherwise, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. The greatest person in the kingdom of...

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