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Snapshots of Dementia: It’s the Little Things

Snapshots of Dementia: It’s the Little Things

Photo by Danielle Rice on Unsplash Over the past several months of my somewhat irregular “snapshots of dementia” posts, I’ve written about lots of big things. Our painful journey toward diagnosis. Job losses. Wounds to our marriage and our family. Asking Tom to stop driving. And more. But I’ve also noticed that with dementia as with many areas of life, the little things often have just as much impact as the large ones. Consider the following as not a list of my favorite things but rather of the little things that touch my heart as I watch his early-onset dementia, frontotemporal degeneration, steal so much from my husband. — Open Doors: Tom’s short-term memory has become so short that he rarely remembers to close doors or drawers. You may recall that much earlier, we had to put special hinges on our front door to close it automatically because more than once, he left it standing open when he left for work. Now I can trace his path through our home by the doors and drawers he leaves open. Praise God for a refrigerator with an alarm! — Press Pause: Sometimes I find Tom standing in our hallway, a blank look on his face. Although it passes quickly, I know this means he’s started to go somewhere or do something and forgotten what he started out to do. I can hear some of you saying, “But I do that all the time.” Yes, but probably not fifteen or more times a day—and within only a few seconds of starting the activity. — Delayed Departure: My experience as the mother of five has prepared me well for my current stage of life. As a mom, I had to plan to leave 10 or 15 minutes earlier than the actual departure time because someone wouldn’t have their shoes on or another would need to make a bathroom stop. Even if I tell Tom, “We have to leave in a few minutes,” his broken brain can’t translate that to the steps he must take to be ready to go. In fact, if I give him only two things to do, he will usually forget one of them. These days, we exit more slowly and often have to make a trip or two back inside before our true departure. — “You’re So Smart”: Tom often makes this comment multiple times a day. “You’re so smart” because I could log onto the library website. “You’re so smart” because I knew how to install an app on my phone. “You’re so smart” because I remembered what I had planned for the weekend. What touches my heart here? He never used to say, “You’re so smart” because...

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Snapshots of Dementia: The Great Depression (or not)

Snapshots of Dementia: The Great Depression (or not)

Photo by Stefano Pollio on Unsplash If your snapshots are anything like mine, they fill a shoebox (OK, mine fill an entire trunk) and most are in random order. I have long-ago dreams of putting them in beautiful, chronological albums (I’m sure God has a special place in heaven for those who have achieved this wondrous feat), but so far, it hasn’t happened. I don’t think it will happen with these snapshots either. So, although I’ve written somewhat chronologically, you may have noticed I’ve also skipped back, forth and around as I’ve focused my lens on different parts of our journey and of Tom’s disease. And I imagine that, even if you’ve never been exposed to dementia before, you’ve seen that this disease is exactly like that. Messy. Disorganized. Uncomfortable. I’ll move us forward a bit on our timeline to our visits with a second neurologist. We’re all the way up to early 2019 now, and many things have changed for Tom. Just the year before, his first neurologist told us (for the second time) that things were basically fine, that he just had some short-term memory loss and (for the first and only time) that he was “better than the 80-year-old Alzheimer’s patients I see.” A neuropsychologist had also done extensive testing (which I eventually found out our insurance did not cover, although no one told me that at the time; I mention this so anyone reading will check first and not have to shell out the nearly $1800 I did almost a year later). This doctor concluded that Tom was very intelligent, probably had adult ADHD (a diagnosis he had already received) and was dealing with shame as the result of some of his extremely poor and uncharacteristic behavioral choices over the past few years. No one told us about frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), behavioral type. No one mentioned that dementia could not only cause memory loss and confused thinking but that it could also cause personality changes of the extreme type we saw in Tom. No one mentioned that perhaps he didn’t have a moral problem but a mental one. That’s why I have such a deep commitment to tell our story. I did suspect a problem; I just didn’t realize so much of what I was seeing in my husband was tied to what we now know to be FTD. But I digress. Finally, we visited a second neurologist. This one came recommended from more than one friend. I was confident that this time, we would get some answers. So much had changed in Tom’s life that I felt sure the doctor would see the problems right away. We had (well, I had, because Tom could...

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